Proposed Copyright Directive passes the European Parliament

Update Update

On September 12th, 2018, the European Parliament adopted its revised negotiating position on the Copyright Directive, proposed by the European Commission in September 2016: 438 votes in favour, 226 against and 39 abstentions.

On September 12th, 2018, the European Parliament adopted its revised negotiating position on the Copyright Directive, proposed by the European Commission in September 2016: 438 votes in favour, 226 against and 39 abstentions. The first position drafted by Rapporteur Axel Voss (Germany, European People’s Party) was rejected in July 2018. Most of the votes in favour came from members of the right-wing European People’s Party (EPP) and about half of members of Socialists and Democrats (S&D).

The amended proposal slightly narrowed the scope of the two most controversial articles – Art. 11 and 13 – which respectively create a right for press publishers to monetize their content on online platforms and a new right making the same platforms liable for copyrighted material with some changes slightly reducing their scope. The adopted version of Art. 11 states that this right must not prevent private uses, non-profit, or the sharing of hyperlinks "accompanied by individual words". As for Art. 13, the text no longer refers to automatic measures for the recognition of copyright infringing content.

The other co-legislator, the Council, reached a position in May 2018. The EU institutions will now proceed to interinstitutional negotiations (trilogue). European Commission’s Vice-President for the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip and Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society Mariya Gabriel welcomed the outcome of the vote and stated its commitment to find an agreement “as soon as possible, ideally by the end of 2018.”